If Architecture is Woman, this is the Sophia Loren of buildings (part deux…)

Zaha Hadid’s passing was a shock to the world of architecture and aficionados of great art alike.  She brought a unique feminine mystique and perspective to the projects entrusted to her, never compromising a very distinct point of view.  If the limits of engineering were tested by her ground-breaking building lines, the results undeniably became timeless.  We’re including some of her greatest achievements here and a copy of a post from last year about her first project for New York City.


Pritzer Prize-winning architect Zaha Hadid unveiled her first project in New York City, a condominium at West 28th Street near the city’s High Line pedestrian park.  Her characteristic materials, which bend into sensuous curves much like Frank Gehry’s titanium designs for the Guggenheim Bilbao and the Walt Disney Concert Hall in Los Angeles, are showcased spectacularly.  The High Line’s Standard Hotel, which sits atop the park, has been that urban project’s focus for some time.  It now has competition.

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If Architecture is Woman, Zaha Hadid has just designed the Sophia Loren of buildings…

Pritzer Prize-winning architect Zaha Hadid has unveiled her first project in New York City, a condominium at West 28th Street near the city’s High Line pedestrian park.  Her characteristic materials, which bend into sensuous curves much like Frank Gehry’s titanium designs for the Guggenheim Bilbao and the Walt Disney Concert Hall in Los Angeles, are showcased spectacularly.  The High Line’s Standard Hotel, which sits atop the park, has been that urban project’s focus for some time.  It now has competition.

Zaha Hadid-01

© 2013 Zaha Hadid Architects

World-renowned and Pritzker Prize-winning architect Frank Gehry…

Beekman Tower-02

© 2013 commons.wikimedia.org

…admired for the sensuous curves of titanium which form the outer skin of the Guggenheim Museum’s Bilbao location along with the Walt Disney Concert Hall in Los Angeles, has consistently managed to surprise and impress over his long and storied career.

One of his most recent creations is New York City’s Beekman Tower, the tallest residential tower in the world.  From a distance, the building seems out-of-place and its surface appears as if something has gone horribly wrong.  It’s only as you get closer you realize Gehry has introduced his trademark curved metal as the tower’s exterior.  Upon closer inspection still do you fully realize and appreciate the enormous complexity of engineering involved–that of undulating water being poured from an unseen source above.  It’s a building so exquisite, in fact, the first reaction you have will be that of shivers down your spine.  To continue reading the Architecture page, click here.

Barcelona…

Image

© 2013 commons.wikimedia.org

…for many years was unjustifiably perceived as the impetuous little sister to the older and wiser Madrid.  That changed, virtually overnight in fact, with the 1992 Olympic Summer Games which helped propel Spain’s capital of Catalonia into the ranks of the world’s greatest cities.  Its growth and cosmopolitan persona have rapidly continued since then.

Nothing can announce a city’s arrival on the global stage faster or with more aplomb than a world-class building from a world-class architect.  Barcelona took a tremendous risk but ultimately hit a home run with Jean Nouvel.  The Pritzker Prize-winning, French architect created a beautiful gem of a building when he designed Torre Agbar for the city.  Located in the tech neighborhood between Avinguda Diagonal and Carrer Badajoz, the tower’s concrete-and-glass exterior resembles ripples of water.  At night, an LED design illuminates the structure with myriad, subtle displays.  It’s a building whose entirely modern design might seem completely out-of-place in such a city as old and historic as Barcelona.  Nothing, however, can be further from the truth as Torre Agbar gives Barcelona a modern skyline while simultaneously paying homage to the city’s favorite if not controversial son, Antoni Gaudi.  To continue reading the Architecture page, click here.